motivationintohabit"Motivation is what gets you started. Habit is what keeps you going."



I hope to be the shining light in the dark world of thinspo, unhealthy advice and incorrect information. Life is about being happy and loving yourself, and that includes your body. Feed it with the foods it loves, let it run free, treat it to a nice dinner and some wine every now and again and your body will take care of you too. <3

Cycling Instructor at The Fitness Center at Kilroy
Group Fitness Instructor and Personal Trainer at Mo-Mentum Fitness

Nationally Certified:
- Personal Trainer
- Group Fitness Instructor
- Schwinn Indoor Cycling Instructor
- Bootie Camp Yoga Instructor

Goodies!!

Pick your plan

Following

"MOTHERFUCKER, THIS QUOTE IS SO DAMN BIG YOU AIN’T GOT NO CHOICE BUT TO READ IT. "

— Now that I have your attention, you have a nice bum. (via hedlunds)

(Source: totallyfubar, via patterns-within-chaos-x)

“What a killer smile! I think I'm in-love again <3 tahahaa!”
-Anonymous

06.06.130 NOTES Reblog
“what's some cardio to lose back fat? like I guess you can call it my 'muffin top' lol but it's mostly in the back, the front near my belly and stuff is flat. like when you look at me from the front I look slimmer than when you look at me from the back (in a bathing suit)”
-Anonymous

Short answer: there isn’t. Losing fat from a specific area is impossible.
Long answer in FAQ :)

06.06.131 NOTES Reblog

lifeisyourstomiss:

mindovermatters007:

Adam Hills destroys Joan Rivers for her Adele comments.

A ROLE MODEL????? ARE FUCKING SERIOUS? ADELE IS FAT AND THIS NOT A GOOD ROLE MODEL:::IT IS NOT NORMAL OR HEALTHY TO EAT SO MUCH AND GET OBESE!!!!!!OTHER PEOPLE ARE STARVING!

I’m sorry, but when did Adele ever disclose her eating or exercising habits? Did she ever release medical information telling the public her health status? Because you definitely CANNOT tell anything about her health just by looking at her. Just like you cannot look at a skinny person and know their health status. Your size does not say anything about your health.

And regardless, why do skinny celebrities have to be the only role models? Adele is a role model because she is beautiful, talented, mature, and works incredibly hard for everything she’s achieved. She has never been in the media for being arrested, binge drinking out at clubs every night, or for even saying something negative about another celebrity. THAT’S what makes her a role model. Not to mention her album 21 has been on the top 40 charts for 118 consecutive weeks. Her talent speaks for itself.

(Source: paperbagperson, via mack-la-more)

firefliesnight:

Kate Nash’s advice to college students.

(Source: , via michellemahbelle)

What #collegekids do for #deadweek. #koolkids #sofafort #lastyear! 🎓🎉📚📖 (at The House of Gold)

What #collegekids do for #deadweek. #koolkids #sofafort #lastyear! 🎓🎉📚📖 (at The House of Gold)

Last day teaching fitness classes as an intern. Yeah buddy!! :)

06.05.135 NOTES Reblog
thehealthycook:

Calorie counting is common within the weight-loss community, but it doesn’t mean you should do it. Here are 10 reasons why counting calories doesn’t always work:
Counting calories over-simplifies healthy eating. Eating a healthy diet is complicated and nutrition labels over-simplify it. We are led to believe that low calorie foods are good and high calorie foods are bad. But it is a lot more complicated than that. This way of thinking can lead to eating disorders, infertility, illness, and depression because it encourages the consumption of processed foods instead of nourishing foods. 
Counting calories prevents a positive, healthy relationship with food. Always being calorie-conscious changes your focus from how you eat to how much you eat. This can prevent you from having a positive relationship with food. Instead of thinking of food as life-giving nourishment, counting calories can make you feel apprehensive toward food, or even make you think of food as being bad for you as if it is the enemy.
Counting calories creates a stressful relationship with food that can interfere with digestion.Feeling stressed while eating is bad for you because it can interfere with digestion. The sympathetic nervous system triggers responses in the body that can shut down the digestive system so the body can deal with the stressful situation.
Counting calories can also increase your feelings of depression. You may feel depressed when you feel you’ve eaten too many calories because you ate that burger and chocolate shake you feel you shouldn’t have. The constant pressure from tracking calories and feeling like you’ve let yourself down when you go over your daily caloric intake can increase feelings of depression.
Counting calories is extremely inaccurate. Not only is it wrong to think calories from different foods are the same, but you shouldn’t always believe the numbers of calories printed on labels because they are often wrong. The calorie tables we use today are outdated. Dietitian Rick Miller says, “We’ve known for some time that the calculations for certain foods such as vegetables and high-fiber foods are inaccurate. The calorie figures you see on a food label aren’t always the amount you will ingest.”
Quality of calories is more important than quantity. If you count calories, you may become obsessed with calorie counting. You may buy low-fat this and fat-free that, but these foods lack much needed vitamins and nutritional value. Can you lose fat by eating low-fat and fat-free foods? Yes, but it’s far from eating healthy because you are not getting all the nutrients your body needs. Plus, these foods often replace the fat with sugar, which then gets stored as fat in your body. Your calories should mainly come from whole, natural foods that don’t have labels—the foods that are made by Mother Nature. And, you should avoid eating processed and packaged foods as much as possible, including those that are labeled as low-fat and fat-free. In many cases, these foods are worse for you than the full-fat products.
Calorie counting adds more work to your already busy life. It’s work to constantly tabulate calories for every meal, or record everything you eat in a food diary or journal. You probably don’t need to add more work to your already busy life, so forget calorie counting and focus your efforts elsewhere like exercising or cooking healthier meals for your family.
Counting calories encourages calorie-restriction, which slows metabolism and makes it difficult to lose weight. The biggest problem with using linear calorie equations for fat loss is thatthe fewer calories you consume, the fewer calories your body burns. When you start a calorie-restricted diet, you will probably find that you lose a pound or so in the first week but less in subsequent weeks. This phenomenon is believed to be a metabolic adaptation to prevent starvation and keep your body balanced. But a slower metabolism means slower weight loss, and counting calories encourages this.
Counting calories is not a way to guide your nutritional health. Counting calories should be used as just one tool for weight loss and should not be used as a long-term solution. It should be used as a learning tool to become more aware of how many calories are in junk foods and sodas, for instance, but it’s not a tool for guiding your nutritional health.
Calorie counting interferes with “intuitive eating.” Humans are, by design, intuitive eaters. This means that if you knew nothing about calories, carbs, fats, proteins, vitamins or minerals contained in foods, you would naturally eat the foods your body needs to stay healthy. Sometimes your body may crave carbs while other times it may crave fats, and there are reasons for this. Your body intuitively knows what it needs to stay healthy and balanced, and counting calories interferes with this intuitive ability to eat healthfully. (source x)

thehealthycook:

Calorie counting is common within the weight-loss community, but it doesn’t mean you should do it. Here are 10 reasons why counting calories doesn’t always work:

  1. Counting calories over-simplifies healthy eating. Eating a healthy diet is complicated and nutrition labels over-simplify it. We are led to believe that low calorie foods are good and high calorie foods are bad. But it is a lot more complicated than that. This way of thinking can lead to eating disorders, infertility, illness, and depression because it encourages the consumption of processed foods instead of nourishing foods
  2. Counting calories prevents a positive, healthy relationship with food. Always being calorie-conscious changes your focus from how you eat to how much you eat. This can prevent you from having a positive relationship with food. Instead of thinking of food as life-giving nourishment, counting calories can make you feel apprehensive toward food, or even make you think of food as being bad for you as if it is the enemy.
  3. Counting calories creates a stressful relationship with food that can interfere with digestion.Feeling stressed while eating is bad for you because it can interfere with digestion. The sympathetic nervous system triggers responses in the body that can shut down the digestive system so the body can deal with the stressful situation.
  4. Counting calories can also increase your feelings of depression. You may feel depressed when you feel you’ve eaten too many calories because you ate that burger and chocolate shake you feel you shouldn’t have. The constant pressure from tracking calories and feeling like you’ve let yourself down when you go over your daily caloric intake can increase feelings of depression.
  5. Counting calories is extremely inaccurate. Not only is it wrong to think calories from different foods are the same, but you shouldn’t always believe the numbers of calories printed on labels because they are often wrong. The calorie tables we use today are outdated. Dietitian Rick Miller says, “We’ve known for some time that the calculations for certain foods such as vegetables and high-fiber foods are inaccurate. The calorie figures you see on a food label aren’t always the amount you will ingest.”
  6. Quality of calories is more important than quantity. If you count calories, you may become obsessed with calorie counting. You may buy low-fat this and fat-free that, but these foods lack much needed vitamins and nutritional value. Can you lose fat by eating low-fat and fat-free foods? Yes, but it’s far from eating healthy because you are not getting all the nutrients your body needs. Plus, these foods often replace the fat with sugar, which then gets stored as fat in your body. Your calories should mainly come from whole, natural foods that don’t have labels—the foods that are made by Mother Nature. And, you should avoid eating processed and packaged foods as much as possible, including those that are labeled as low-fat and fat-free. In many cases, these foods are worse for you than the full-fat products.
  7. Calorie counting adds more work to your already busy life. It’s work to constantly tabulate calories for every meal, or record everything you eat in a food diary or journal. You probably don’t need to add more work to your already busy life, so forget calorie counting and focus your efforts elsewhere like exercising or cooking healthier meals for your family.
  8. Counting calories encourages calorie-restriction, which slows metabolism and makes it difficult to lose weight. The biggest problem with using linear calorie equations for fat loss is thatthe fewer calories you consume, the fewer calories your body burns. When you start a calorie-restricted diet, you will probably find that you lose a pound or so in the first week but less in subsequent weeks. This phenomenon is believed to be a metabolic adaptation to prevent starvation and keep your body balanced. But a slower metabolism means slower weight loss, and counting calories encourages this.
  9. Counting calories is not a way to guide your nutritional health. Counting calories should be used as just one tool for weight loss and should not be used as a long-term solution. It should be used as a learning tool to become more aware of how many calories are in junk foods and sodas, for instance, but it’s not a tool for guiding your nutritional health.
  10. Calorie counting interferes with “intuitive eating.” Humans are, by design, intuitive eaters. This means that if you knew nothing about calories, carbs, fats, proteins, vitamins or minerals contained in foods, you would naturally eat the foods your body needs to stay healthy. Sometimes your body may crave carbs while other times it may crave fats, and there are reasons for this. Your body intuitively knows what it needs to stay healthy and balanced, and counting calories interferes with this intuitive ability to eat healthfully. (source x)

(via happy-healthy-and-fit)

what the fitblr community has taught me.

  • love yourself no matter what.
  • never compare yourself to others.
  • you are in control of your own happiness.
  • and never rely on someone for that happiness.
  • never let your healthy lifestyle get in the way of living or hold you back from doing what you want/love - it's okay to go out for ice cream or pizza with friends once in a while.
  • being skinny is not everything.
  • being skinny won't make people like you.
  • being skinny won't make you entirely happy.
  • skinny does not always mean healthy.
  • never change yourself for ANYONE. someone out there is bound to accept every little aspect of your truly beautiful self.
  • some things DO taste better than skinny feels. trust me.
  • don't get down on yourself after eating something "bad." food is good. it keeps you alive.
  • "perfection" should not even be acceptable as a word. no one is perfect and people should stop striving so desperately to achieve it.
  • the most beautiful characteristic someone can have is self-love and acceptance. it's inspiring to others and creates strong and powerful relationships.
  • always look for the good in people.
  • never let your insecurities hold you back from doing something you want.
  • it's too easy to hate yourself in a world where the words "ugly" and "fat" are constantly thrown around. this is the body you were given and you shouldn't waste your life away by hating it.

cafai:

kayelljay94:

One in five. 
That’s how many anorexia sufferers die.
20%.
My friend just had someone in her family diagnosed with cancer. He has an 84% survival rate. 
I am more likely to survive cancer than I am to survive anorexia.
That is how deadly this disorder is. 
This is not a phase. This is not a diet.
This is life or death.

Thank you for this

(via fitforthesmokies)

fly to Top « back next »
Athenability
Design by Athenability
Powered by Tumblr