motivationintohabit"Motivation is what gets you started. Habit is what keeps you going."



I hope to be the shining light in the dark world of thinspo, unhealthy advice and incorrect information. Life is about being happy and loving yourself, and that includes your body. Feed it with the foods it loves, let it run free, treat it to a nice dinner and some wine every now and again and your body will take care of you too. <3

Cycling Instructor at The Fitness Center at Kilroy
Group Fitness Instructor and Personal Trainer at Mo-Mentum Fitness

Nationally Certified:
- Personal Trainer
- Group Fitness Instructor
- Schwinn Indoor Cycling Instructor
- Bootie Camp Yoga Instructor

Goodies!!

Pick your plan

Following

“Hey! Love your blog, you're a huge inspiration to me. <3 I wondered if you could reccomend some running shoes? Thanks!”
-Anonymous

Awe thank you so much love!!!

08.02.140 NOTES Reblog
Congratulations on your new baby @_nataliesmith_ @theclaypool so excited to meet the new addition to our home! @da_jenks #waffles #royalbreed #corgi #wholetthedogsout

Congratulations on your new baby @_nataliesmith_ @theclaypool so excited to meet the new addition to our home! @da_jenks #waffles #royalbreed #corgi #wholetthedogsout

a-cup-of-moriartea:

reminder a lot of people have this show up on their dash and it does remind them to eat after genuinely forgetting to so thank you for this

a-cup-of-moriartea:

reminder a lot of people have this show up on their dash and it does remind them to eat after genuinely forgetting to so thank you for this

(Source: inkale, via hollywooddreamersinc)

(Source: luxy-rose, via treecoffee)

a-tiny-romantic-dream:

ben-c:

theflowerwithoutfragrance:

ben-c:

i’ve literally been getting people messaging me daily about this BS since i made that post about fasting being unhealthy.

so here.

here are the actual irrefutable scientifically proven facts on the matter.

if you want natural ways to lose weight that are HEALTHY, or natural ways to cleanse that are HEALTHY, feel free to message me and i will help you without letting you starve

please for lucifer’s sake stop stop stop condoning starvation. it’s dangerous and it’s deadly and i am so sick of impressionable young people being taught that this is acceptable in any way. starvation is not the answer to anything

Always reblog

what do u mean always reblog i posted this 5 minutes ago

THIS THIS THIS. I have caused myself permanent damage. After three years I said to my doctor ‘well, by now my metabolism should have gone back to normal, right?’ hahahHAHA….. No, it didn’t. “It never will”, she replied. Losing weight for those in recovery is hard but it is still possible, by working out and building muscle (that burn the calories your slowed down metabolism won’t burn).

Just don’t ever starve yourself, don’t skip meals. 

<3

(via tuckhasthoughts)

"Build Muscle
Your body constantly burns calories, even when you’re doing nothing. This resting metabolic rate is much higher in people with more muscle. Every pound of muscle uses about 6 calories a day just to sustain itself, while each pound of fat burns only 2 calories daily. "

“Hey I absolutely adore your blog, you have been a true inspiration to me through my healthy weight loss progress! Recently, I have fallen behind in workouts and put back on some weight. I am determined to get back on track, but I just broke my big toe so I can't run for a bit! Do you have any good floor workouts that are safe to do with an injured foot? I don't want to injure myself further, but I want to stay fit!”
-Anonymous

Awe thank you love!! That made my day! <3

You definitely want to lay off of it for a while.  If you push your toe, you won’t heal all the way or correctly and you want to be able to safely go all out in the future yes?  

Upper body and core are easy to target without putting pressure on your toe.  You can do all upper body sitting down - bis, tris, shoulders, chest if you lay down, back with cables.  You will burn less calories as you would standing up, but it’s better to protect that foot for now.  Core can be done laying down - sit ups, side to sides, bicycles, let lifts, everything but prone exercises like planks (unless you want t go to your knees). 

As for legs - I had a client that had surgery on her big toe and was out for a while, but she still wanted to do everything we used to, so we did a lot of balance and one legged stuff.  This is completely up to you as you will be a little uneven since you have to keep pressure off your affected toe.  Lower body exercises that are completely toe free are very limited.  You can get your hamstrings by laying down, putting your feet on a stability ball and pulling the ball toward your butt with your feet flexed still on top of the ball. Bridges work your quads and butt - lay down with your heels digging into the ground and toes up and bring your hips toward the ceiling or sky.  Hips - lay on your side and lift legs up and down. 

Good luck love and I’m sorry about your toe <3

07.30.140 NOTES Reblog

(Source: gym-fit, via oats-n-whoas)

perspicious:


WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:    Stay with us and keep calm.The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.
Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.
Move us to a quiet place.We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.
Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.
Speak to us in short, simple sentences.
Be predictable. Avoid surprises.
Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.As odd as it sounds, it works.


                                                                                                                 


WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”2. Say, “Calm down.”This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.”Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.



CREDIT [X]  [X]

perspicious:

WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:
    
  1. Stay with us and keep calm.
    The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.

  2. Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.
    You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.

  3. Move us to a quiet place.
    We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.

  4. Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.
    We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.

  5. Speak to us in short, simple sentences.

  6. Be predictable. Avoid surprises.

  7. Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.
    As odd as it sounds, it works.
                                                                                                                 
WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:

1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”
We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.

Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.

Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”


2. Say, “Calm down.”
This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.

Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.

Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.


3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”
Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.

Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.


4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”
Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.

The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.

Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.


CREDIT [X]  [X]

(via teaflex)

mulanlifts:

3 Different Rep Ranges for Strength, Hypertrophy &amp; Endurance
There are three rep ranges that correspond to the three biomotor capacities: strength, muscle building, and endurance:
Strength training entails lifting heavy loads for low reps. Specifically, the 1-5 rep range is best for gaining strength. Powerlifters tend to lift predominately in the 1-3 rep range (i.e. heavy singles, doubles and triples) for their main lifts.
Hypertrophy training, or training to build muscle, entails lifting moderate loads for moderate reps. Often, 8-12 reps is cited as the best rep range for hypertrophy. However, I contest that the 6-15 rep range is more inclusive and accurate.
Endurance training entails lifting light loads for high reps. Specifically, doing more than 15 repsper set trains muscular endurance. Doing such high repetitions places trains the muscle fibers that are resistant to fatigue under stress. In other words, you get better at doing more reps of a certain weight, as opposed to getting better at lifting a heavier weight within a lower rep range.
How Long Should I Rest Between Sets?
How long should you rest between sets? It depends largely on what type of training you’re doing? Here are the basic guidelines:
Two to four minutes of rest between sets is recommended for strength training.
One to two minutes of rest between sets is recommended for hypertrophy training.
Thirty seconds to one minute of rest between sets is recommended for endurance training.
Consider Intensity, Volume &amp; Frequency
The number of reps and sets in your workouts should take intensity, volume and frequency into consideration.
Intensity (or load intensity) technically refers to the percentage of your one-rep max weight used on a set for any given exercise. Practically, though, you can think of intensity as the weight’s “heaviness” (i.e. how heavy it feels, not the actual weight in lbs). High intensity workouts always involve low reps, and usually involve relatively few sets. Low intensity routines are the opposite.
Volume refers to the total work (reps x sets) done in a particular workout session. High volume routines typically involve moderate to high reps and more sets per workout. Low volume routines are the opposite.
Frequency refers to how often you train a particular muscle group or exercise, per week. A high frequency routine can have lower reps and fewer sets and per workout if it involves mostly high intensity training; or it can have higher reps and more sets if the intensity is moderate to low. Low frequency routines are the opposite.
This is not my article. You can check out the who article here 

mulanlifts:

3 Different Rep Ranges for Strength, Hypertrophy & Endurance

There are three rep ranges that correspond to the three biomotor capacities: strength, muscle building, and endurance:

  • Strength training entails lifting heavy loads for low reps. Specifically, the 1-5 rep range is best for gaining strength. Powerlifters tend to lift predominately in the 1-3 rep range (i.e. heavy singles, doubles and triples) for their main lifts.
  • Hypertrophy training, or training to build muscle, entails lifting moderate loads for moderate reps. Often, 8-12 reps is cited as the best rep range for hypertrophy. However, I contest that the 6-15 rep range is more inclusive and accurate.
  • Endurance training entails lifting light loads for high reps. Specifically, doing more than 15 repsper set trains muscular endurance. Doing such high repetitions places trains the muscle fibers that are resistant to fatigue under stress. In other words, you get better at doing more reps of a certain weight, as opposed to getting better at lifting a heavier weight within a lower rep range.

How Long Should I Rest Between Sets?

How long should you rest between sets? It depends largely on what type of training you’re doing? Here are the basic guidelines:

  • Two to four minutes of rest between sets is recommended for strength training.
  • One to two minutes of rest between sets is recommended for hypertrophy training.
  • Thirty seconds to one minute of rest between sets is recommended for endurance training.

Consider Intensity, Volume & Frequency

The number of reps and sets in your workouts should take intensity, volume and frequency into consideration.

  • Intensity (or load intensity) technically refers to the percentage of your one-rep max weight used on a set for any given exercise. Practically, though, you can think of intensity as the weight’s “heaviness” (i.e. how heavy it feels, not the actual weight in lbs). High intensity workouts always involve low reps, and usually involve relatively few sets. Low intensity routines are the opposite.
  • Volume refers to the total work (reps x sets) done in a particular workout session. High volume routines typically involve moderate to high reps and more sets per workout. Low volume routines are the opposite.
  • Frequency refers to how often you train a particular muscle group or exercise, per week. A high frequency routine can have lower reps and fewer sets and per workout if it involves mostly high intensity training; or it can have higher reps and more sets if the intensity is moderate to low. Low frequency routines are the opposite.

This is not my article. You can check out the who article here 

(via teaflex)

iwillbesexyandiknowit:

SUCH AN INSPIRATION!

iwillbesexyandiknowit:

SUCH AN INSPIRATION!

(via happy-healthy-and-fit)

extrachewy:

21 Energy-Boosting Breakfast Toast (via Buzzfeed)

extrachewy:

21 Energy-Boosting Breakfast Toast (via Buzzfeed)

(via labelmehealthyyy)

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